Hepatic steatosis common in young adults with life-long HIV

Colleen Hadigan, MD, MPH

Colleen Hadigan

Thirty-three percent of young adults with HIV since birth or early childhood have hepatic steatosis, a prevalence comparable to older adults with HIV and “significantly higher” than HIV-negative controls, according to research published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases.  Read More

A seventh man has contracted HIV while using PrEP — but you don’t need to worry

Credit: Avector/iStoc / Getty Images Plus, Francesca Roh/Xtra

Here’s the background

Steve Spencer, 27, tested positive for HIV in December 2018, even though he had been using pre-exposure prophylaxis (commonly known as PrEP) for several years. Spencer was prescribed the “on demand” dose, which means he took a higher dose before and up to 48 hours after sex. Read More

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And it is also clear that despite stringent transplant rules, no HIV-positive patient needs to die for want of an organ.

HIV, read in the Eighties as an immediate sentence to a lingering death, has now been controlled to the extent that a living HIV-positive woman has donated a kidney to an HIV-positive recipient. Living-to-living donation is commonplace among people without serious conditions, but was hitherto unknown in the HIV-positive community, where even the possibility of receiving a kidney is limited by the condition that the patient must have a zero viral load. Read More

Is elimination of vertical transmission of HIV in high prevalence settings achievable?

The idea of eliminating infectious diseases from society dates to the 18th century, when Edward Jenner envisioned elimination of smallpox through widespread vaccination. By 1997, the difference between control, eradication, and elimination had been defined (box 1).12 Of the perinatally acquired infections, only tetanus, HIV, and syphilis have been targeted for elimination.34  Read More

Epidemic of sexually transmitted hepatitis C in gay men now involves both HIV-positive and HIV-negative men

Incidence of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) among PrEP-using MSM in Lyon increased ten-fold between 2016 and 2017, according to research published in Clinical Infectious Diseases. There was also a doubling of incidence among HIV-positive MSM, mainly as a result of re-infection. There were distinct clusters of infections, over half involving both HIV-positive and HIV-negative men.  Read More

Vancouverites should be ‘really proud of your humanity,’ says U.S.-based needle exchange director

Dr. Hansel Tookes, a doctor at Miami’s first needle exchange, says Vancouver is leading the way in harm reduction — but the city still grapples with universal challenges of stigma and gentrification.

Dr. Hansel Tookes, a doctor at Miami’s first needle exchange, says Vancouver is leading the way in harm reduction — but the city still grapples with universal challenges of stigma and gentrification.  (HANSEL TOOKES)

Vancouver is leading the way in harm reduction and the prevention of overdoses but faces similar gentrification and stigma challenges to most other cities, according to the director of a landmark needle-exchange program in the U.S. Read More